Injured? Free Advice (800) 777-0028

Name Your Price: What do you want to pay for Michigan auto insurance?

Michigan auto insurance prices

Gov. Rick Snyder, Rep. Pete Lund, and Michigan’s auto insurance industry claim that their motivation for House Bill 4612 is to save consumers money on auto insurance.

You can review the chart below to see just how much Michigan drivers will be giving up in exchange for a one-time promise of savings of approximately $150. And to read more information about Michigan No Fault reform, visit our comprehensive resource center.

So, for you auto insurance consumers out there, it’s time to have your voices heard:

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO PAY FOR MICHIGAN AUTO INSURANCE?

Share your opinion. Here’s how:

  1. Post a comment below.
  2. Tweet Michigan Auto Law at @michiganautolaw and/or post a Tweet using the hashtag #NameYourPrice.
  3. Post on Michigan Auto Law’s Facebook wall.
  4. Post on Google + and mention Michigan Auto Law by using “+Michigan Auto Law.”

After we receive your feedback, we will gather up and organize your comments and opinions in a blog post, which will share not only with you, but also with Gov. Snyder, Rep. Lund, Michigan politicians and Michigan’s auto insurance industry. And we will share the results with you in a new blog.

What is No Fault reform’s ‘raw deal’ worth to you? Or is it ‘no deal’?

The politicians are trying to sell their plan for dismantling or “reforming” Michigan’s No Fault auto insurance system by promising that it will save consumers money (Note: the promised savings expire after one year).

And, you, the consumers have taken to the airwaves, the Internet and the newspapers to declare that you’re paying more than you want to and, most importantly, more than you think you should have to.

In their recently introduced No Fault reform proposal, House Bill 4612, Gov. Snyder and Rep. Pete Lund have promised $150 in savings for one year. This doesn’t include the ongoing Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association assessments, or the $21 million annual assessment to fund the Insurance Fraud and Theft Prevention authorities or the inevitable increases in health insurance costs and/or taxpayers’ Medicaid burden. For more information, read our blog on how HB 4612 could cost you more for your auto insurance.

But their promised, one-year savings of $150 would only reduce Michigan’s average auto insurance rate to $923 – at best. It’s currently $1,073, according to data from the Insurance Institute of Michigan and the data presented by Gov. Snyder at his April 18, 2013, press conference.

Nevertheless, Michigan’s auto insurance consumers are saying $923 is still not low enough.

Given all that consumers are being expected to sacrifice in exchange for the one-year savings of $150, we agree.

As we said in our recently published, “The Auto Insurance Consumers’ Guide to Michigan No Fault Reform and House Bill 4612,” Gov. Snyder’s and Rep. Lund’s proposal for reforming Michigan’s No Fault auto insurance system is a raw deal for Michigan auto insurance consumers.

The following “No Fault Reform Balance Sheet For Consumers” illustrates the point:

No Fault reform balance sheet for consumers

(Page Numbers Refer to House Bill 4612)
NF reform balance sheet

Take action – tell the politicians what you expect from them, not the other way around

It’s time for Gov. Snyder, Rep. Lund and the auto insurance industry to level with Michigan’s auto insurance-buying public about what’s truly at stake with No Fault reform.

Gov. Snyder, Rep. Lund and the auto insurance industry must tell the public how they plan to reconcile their lavish “wish list” of “reforms” in HB 4612 with the savings that consumers demand – and have been led to expect – from so-called No Fault reform.

If you haven’t told the Governor, the politicians and the auto insurance industry what you expect No Fault “reform” to deliver in terms of auto insurance savings and lower prices, then now’s the time:

NAME YOUR PRICE.

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO PAY FOR MICHIGAN AUTO INSURANCE?

 – Photo courtesy of Creative Commons, from seniorliving.org

This entry was tagged Tags: ,
Community Guidelines
comments powered by Disqus
Blog Author Steven M. Gursten
Read Our Reviews
Free Consultation